The politics of the forest frontier: Negotiating between conservation, development, and indigenous rights in Cross River State, Nigeria

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Land Use Policy | November 2013

The politics of the forest frontier: Negotiating between conservation, development, and indigenous rights in Cross River State, Nigeria

by George Christoffel Schoneveld, CIFOR

Abstract

Nigeria’s once thriving plantation economy has suffered under decades of state neglect and political and civil turmoil. Since Nigeria’s return to civilian rule in 1999, in a bid to modernize its ailing agri- cultural economy, most of its defunct plantations were privatized and large new areas of land were allocated to ‘high-capacity’ agricultural investors. This paper explores the local tensions associated with this policy shift in Cross River State, which, due to its favorable agro-ecological conditions and investment climate, has become one of Nigeria’s premier agricultural investment destinations. It shows how the state’s increasing reliance on the private sector as an impetus for rural transformation is, paradoxically, crowding out smallholder production systems and creating new avenues for rent capture by political and customary elites. Moreover, as Nigeria’s most biodiverse and forested state, the rapid expansion of the agricultural frontier into forest buffer zones is threatening to undermine many of the state’s conserva- tion initiatives and valuable common pool resources. The paper goes on to explain why and how private sector interests in Cross River State are increasingly being prioritized over natural resource protection, indigenous rights over the commons, and smallholder production systems.

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Original source: LUP
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